Contemporary Canadian Artist
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Bad Ass Cop

Bad Ass Cop

36 x 48

Oil on canvas

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment. 

 

Bad Ass Maa Durga

Bad Ass Maa Durga

36 x 48

Oil on canvas

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment. 

 

Bride

Bride

Oil on canvas

36 x 48

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment. 

 

 

Honor, Pride, Tradition

Honor, Pride, Tradition

Cotton salwaar kameez, fluid medium, gold pigment, gold acrylic ink

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment.  

Bad Ass Cop

36 x 48

Oil on canvas

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment. 

 

Bad Ass Maa Durga

36 x 48

Oil on canvas

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment. 

 

Bride

Oil on canvas

36 x 48

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment. 

 

 

Honor, Pride, Tradition

Cotton salwaar kameez, fluid medium, gold pigment, gold acrylic ink

2013

 

 Being a first generation youth from an immigrant family often lends itself to a dichotomous lifestyle and way of thinking. One’s perception of society, politics, relationships and self are challenged by opposing worlds; resulting in a bicultural identity. When viewing Indian culture in particular, one can note how notions of tradition, honor and pride conflict with Western ideals. Devaluation of individualism, filial piety and sexual modesty are just a few of the beliefs that impact the societal gaze surrounding the perception and role of Indian women.

            This series challenges multiple Indian feminist issues from an integrative bicultural standpoint, which accepts and rejects ideals from both Indian and Canadian culture. Indian motifs are juxtaposed with taboo imagery and composition to confront issues of conformity, which are largely regulated by a traditional male gaze. When painted or materialized into sculpture, these taboo ideas are celebrated and become objects of permanence rather than concealment.  

Bad Ass Cop
Bad Ass Maa Durga
Bride
Honor, Pride, Tradition